10 Celebs Who’ve Spoken Out About The Heartbreak Of Losing A Dog

Despite the ample evidence to back it up, there are still naysayers out there who insist that losing a dog can’t compare to losing a person. In reality, experts say losing a dog can sometimes be harder than losing a person. This type of grief process is less socially respected, and dogs dictate much of our routines which end up hugely disrupted when they’re gone.

Fortunately, some people out there with large platforms are using them to banish any doubt that losing a dog really hurts. Here’s a list of notable celebrities who have spoken out about the immense pain of losing a dog.

1. Orlando Bloom

This past summer, Orlando Bloom’s dog Mighty went missing. After seven days of constant searching, only the Miniature Poodle’s collar was located. Bloom updated his fans on Instagram with the devastating news that Mighty was presumed dead.

“I have wept more this week than I thought possible. I feel so grateful to have learned from my little Mighty man that love is eternal and the true meaning of devotion. He was more than a companion. It was a soul connection for sure.”

@orlandobloom/Instagram

The actor emphasized the importance of accepting this intense grief over losing a dog.

“Trust it and don’t be afraid of love or the fear of losing love. Love is eternal. The bond between Mighty and I shows devotion in ways I have not truly understood until now. I am a devoted father & partner, still, there is a reason why they call them ‘man’s best friend.’”

2. Eva Longoria

Longoria lost her 15-year-old dog Jinx shortly before the birth of her child. The Desperate Housewives star shared how sad she was to lose her first baby, her dog.

“He was my baby before this baby in my belly came along. I’m so sad but know that he’s out of his suffering. Anyone who knew me, knew Jinxy.”

@evalongoria/Instagram

3. Tom Hardy

Hardy rescued a terrified stray while filming Lawless in Atlanta, Georgia. Sadly, Woody tragically died at only 6 years old after losing a battle with polymyostisis.

The actor wrote in a passionate obituary on Tumblr:

“He was an Angel. And he was my best friend. We went through so much together. Charlotte worked tirelessly with him to get him through a rough case of separation anxiety. He loved her like his Mum. And when she was pregnant he gaurded her fiercely.”

Hardy knows fate brought Woody into his life, and he’s grateful for that.

He burnt very very bright and, those that burn very bright sometimes burn half as long. Thank you Woody for choosing to find us. We will love you and be with you and you with us forever.”

4. Julianne Hough

The former Dancing With The Stars cast member recently lost her two Cavalier King Charles Spaniels Lexie and Harley. She opened up to her Instagram followers about how deeply their loss affected her.

“Pure love is real, it existed through us. My heart expanded and felt the truth of what is possible. I am forever grateful. Thank you for your love. Thank you for being my babies, my daughters.”

@juleshough/Instagram

5. Tim Tebow

The former NFL quarterback said goodbye to his Rhodesian Ridgeback Bronco in November 2019. He shared an emotional tribute to the late Bronco on Instagram.

“One of the toughest goodbyes. Wanted to make a special tribute to the sweetest boy ever – thank you for all the joy you brought and all the memories.”

@timtebow/Instagram

 6. Lorde

The “Royals” singer recently delayed her album release after losing her dog. She explained in a letter to her fans that she just couldn’t create while she grieved his loss.

“The bright energy I was trying to communicate to you has gone, for now. He was instrumental to the discovery that was taking place. I felt he led me towards the ideas.”

@lordeinfo/Instagram

 7. Oprah Winfrey

Oprah famously loves dogs and lives among several. A few years ago, her pup Gracie died tragically after choking on a ball while with a dog walker. The talk show host wrote a long, eloquent tribute to her late dog.

“Not until I knew there’d be no response did I realize how much pleasure I had taken in calling for her. So I called and cried. Called and cried. “Graaaacie!” Tears of sadness for the shocking loss. Tears of joy for the pure happiness she’d given me for nearly two years. I have never seen a being, human or animal, always so full of joy. This dog lived every moment as though it were her last.”

@oprah/Instagram

She described her immense emotional pain, but she also knows that Gracie taught her so much in life.

“Her life was a gift to me. Her death, a greater one.”

 8. Millie Bobby Brown

When Brown’s Mastiff Dolly passed away, she shared with her fans how devastating the loss was. Dolly had been with her family since 2011, when the Stranger Things star was just 7 years old. She wrote on Instagram:

“Your cuddles always felt better than the ones before and your loyalty to our family was incomparable. My heart has broken today. You were the heart and soul of this family and if anyone met Dolly, you know how special she truly was.”

@milliebobbybrown/Instagram

 9. Ashley Tisdale

High School Musical star Tisdale lost her Maltipoo Maui in June of 2019. The loss completely devastated her, and she openly shared her grief with fans.

“I don’t even know how to say this. This pain is the worst pain I’ve ever felt. Maui was my soulmate, the connection was unlike any other.”

@ashleytisdale/Instagram

The actress also acknowledged that though getting through the day without Maui became extremely difficult, she wanted to push through for the late pup.

“Back to work today and although I’m dying inside Maui would want me to keep going. In these moments she’s giving me the strength to push through. It’s hard, every single second of every hour but I want to make her proud.”

 10. Ian Somerhalder

Somerhalder loves animals, which is clear from the Ian Somerhalder Foundation which supports animal and environmental causes. The Lost and Vampire Diaries actor also rescues pups. When he lost his German Shepherd in 2018, he expressed his gratitude for her impact on his life.

I’ve never known a more incredible animal. A soul that spoke 1,000 languages. Kid, I will miss you and anyone that ever got to know you will miss you.”

@iansomerhalder/Instagram

So while grieving people and grieving pets affects everyone differently, know you’re never alone in feeling extra sad over losing your dog.

H/T: Cheatsheet
Featured Image: @oprah/Instagram/@timtebow/Instagram/@evalongoria/Instagram

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Puppy Mills and the Inadequacy of the Animal Welfare Act

Here’s something that all of us can agree on: No one should ever buy a puppy from a puppy mill. Puppy mills are horrific and should be put out of business. 

An estimated 2 million puppies are “produced” annually in puppy mills in the U.S. Since the number of dogs who are euthanized by shelters in this country every year is estimated to be 1.2 million, you can see why simply shutting down puppy mills is such an alluring idea to those of us who have worked in shelters. But it’s difficult to put an end to any practice that some people profit from, no matter how cruel it is.

That’s why we try to educate people – to make sure they understand, first of all, that any “purebred” or “designer-mix” puppy that’s for sale in a pet shop has been produced by a puppy mill, no matter what the store employees have been told to say. 

We also try to make would-be buyers understand that when they pay for a puppy from a pet store, they are directly supporting canine suffering at the hands of all the shady breeders, brokers, and scammers that supply pet stores. 

Most of us have seen photos and videos taken by animal protection groups following a raid on the worst kind of puppy mill, where the living conditions of the dogs are unspeakably horrendous, with cages crammed with sore-covered dogs stacked on top of more cages, and all of them full of filth. No one would argue for ”businesses” like this to be allowed to continue operation.

It’s much more difficult to recognize the cruelty of puppy mills that advertise how many veterinarians they have on staff, discuss their healthcare and socialization programs, and display pictures of shiny-clean facilities alongside their United States Department of Agriculture (USDA) licenses. The conditions look better – but their breeder dogs are still puppy-producing machines who have no semblance of quality of life. And the puppies will be sold to anyone willing to pay for them and shipped anywhere in the country at too-early ages. 

The bottom line for mills is that puppies are simply “products” – and the puppy miller’s bottom line will always be more important than the welfare of the dogs.

The USDA’s Animal Welfare Act (AWA) establishes legal requirements for the care, handling, housing, transportation, and sale of animals at licensed breeding facilities. Puppy-millers and their downstream co-conspirators like to claim that their USDA licenses and unannounced AWA compliance inspections keep the industry honest. But the reality is, these laws are woefully inadequate. For example, under the AWA: 

• There is no limit to the number of dogs on the premises. A puppy mill could have hundreds or even thousands of dogs.

• There is no minimum requirement for the number of staff that must be available to care for the dogs.

• Dogs may be kept in stacked cages.

• Mesh or wire flooring is allowed.

• Dogs may be forced to relieve themselves in their cages.

• Dogs may be confined in spaces only six inches longer than their bodies, not including the tail.

• A dog may be caged 24 hours a day for his or her entire life, only removed from the cage to be bred.

• There is no exercise requirement if dogs are housed with other dogs and minimum size requirements are met for the dog’s enclosure.

• Dogs can be housed indoors or out with minimal temperature regulation.

• Human interaction is not required.

• Breeding females at the first heat cycle and every heat cycle thereafter is permissible.

• Unwanted animals may auctioned off or killed in a variety of ways.

• There is no transparency to consumers or the public about the results of USDA inspections.

And finally, it should be obvious that the USDA can’t adequately inspect the entire puppy mill industry; currently there are only an estimated 110 inspectors on staff to inspect all the animal facilities under its supervision, including zoos and research labs, in addition to commercial dog breeders and brokers. 

The post Puppy Mills and the Inadequacy of the Animal Welfare Act appeared first on Whole Dog Journal.

Experts Urge Proper Mask Disposal After Dog Nearly Dies Eating One

I know, in the middle of a pandemic the last thing you need is something else to worry about. But this something pertains to a habit you’ll need to develop as long as wearing masks is still necessary. It may just save your dog’s life.

An abandoned rescue dog from Boston named Gibbs learned the hard way what happens when you chew on a discarded face mask. The 7-year-old Schnauzer mix was found in an abandoned home with a few other dogs. The Animal Rescue League of Boston brought him in for veterinary attention.

@AnimalRescueLeagueofBoston/Facebook

Gibbs’ x-rays showed nose wires from two discarded paper masks that created “life-threatening blockage.” Thankfully, he went into surgery just in time. Doctors were able to remove the mask successfully.

@AnimalRescueLeagueofBoston/Facebook

The little guy is in the care of ARL while he recovers. Once he gains more weight, ARL says Gibbs will be up for adoption.

Proper Mask Disposal Can Prevent This From Happening

Ever notice your pup trying to smell your mouth, especially after you’ve eaten? Well think about how you’re breathing mouth-smells into your mask all day. The smell of a discarded mask might appeal to an animal who can swallow it.

In a statement, the Massachusetts Veterinary Medical Association said:

“Masks can smell like food and might attract pets and wildlife. Animals that ingest these items can experience stomach upset, blockages, or worse.”

In general, keeping your trash and other waste concealed in a securely closed container should be routine. As dog people, we know how good our dogs are at breaking into things. Especially things we don’t want them to get into. These naughty rummaging missions can unfortunately end up fatal for our pups.

The ARL warns:

“These items can cause massive stomach upset or blockages, and the metal nose wire in masks may cause a variety of health issues, including sepsis, which may prove fatal if not treated.”

Dogs Don’t Need To Wear Masks

Though there is a canine coronavirus disease, all evidence shows that it differs from the strain that affects us. Dogs cannot infect people and vice versa. The primary mode of transmission for coronavirus in dogs is eating feces. I hope you try to do this anyway, but keep your pup away from any left-behind piles.

Putting a mask on your dog will only irritate them, and they’ll likely remove it like a regular old costume piece.

H/T: CBS Boston
Featured Image: @AnimalRescueLeagueofBoston/Facebook

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This Company Now Includes Dog Adoption As An Employee Benefit

Couple with DogCouple with Dog

Working a full-time job can make it difficult to welcome a furry friend into the family. The adoption fee and supplies can add up quickly. Plus, it’s near impossible to find time in your busy schedule to get the pup fully adjusted. That’s why one company decided that adopting a dog should be taken more seriously in their industry.

The Zebra, an insurance comparison website, is now providing a new benefit for employees. They want everyone in the company to be able to adopt a dog. So, they’re offering $300 annually for each employee to adopt a dog or cat.

Family Walking DogFamily Walking Dog

The $300 is meant to cover the adoption fee for a dog. Also, depending on how much that fee is, this amount could also cover basic supplies. Keith Melnick, the CEO of The Zebra, created this benefit because of his own love for dogs. He used to bring his Lab named Zuma to work daily. The pup definitely lifted his spirits on a regular basis.

“I know this kind of companionship can make a huge difference in quality of life and mental health. Especially now that we’re all working remotely for the foreseeable future, I want to make sure that anyone at The Zebra who wants to, can experience that,” said Melnick.

The Employees’ Responses

On top of covering fees, employees also get paid time off with their furry friends. This allows the employees to help their rescue dogs get adjusted to their new surroundings. It also gives each person a chance to bond with their dog and work on training. This time off is called a “pawternity leave”.

Couple with DogCouple with Dog

So far, a few employees have taken advantage of these incredible benefits. Maribeliz Ortiz, the Agency Quality Assurance Coordinator, brought home an adorable little Dachshund named Niko. She said the pup was her “dream dog” ever since she was little. She wasn’t ready to have children yet, but she was ready to expand her family with a four-legged family member.

Dan Kujanek, the Senior Manager of Performance Marketing, also welcomed a new dog into his home. His family had been wanting to adopt a second dog, and these benefits were the final push they needed. So, they adopted a Shepherd mix named Romy from Austin’s AjK Family Rescue. Kujanek was working from home and he recently got a fenced-in yard, so it was all perfect for the new pup.

If you’re ready to welcome a dog into your family, then it’s important that you have the time and money to care for them. The Zebra’s amazing new benefits help employees bring that perfect dog home. Hopefully, it will also encourage them to adopt a dog from a rescue or shelter. Don’t you wish your job had these one-of-a-kind benefits?

Walking DogWalking Dog

H/T: people.com

The post This Company Now Includes Dog Adoption As An Employee Benefit appeared first on iHeartDogs.com.

Dog Sings Emotional Duet Along With Opera On TV

Ah, the soulful howl of a dog. It has to be one of my favorite genres of music. And I know plenty of others agree, judging by the recent viral success of a UK-based doggie crooner.

Victoria Fox, who manages a food blog called “Best Recipes UK,” shared an inspiring video of that dog on Twitter. In the video, Hugo the 1-year-old Golden Retriever performs a beautiful operatic duet along with opera legend Luciano Pavarotti. Well, Pavarotti sings ‘Nessun dorma’ on TV and Hugo sings along from his living room.

Apparently, this is one of Hugo’s favorite pastimes. On Twitter via @BestRecipesUK, Fox noted:

“He loves all opera but especially Pavarotti.”

@BestRecipesUK/Twitter

Hugo does appear to be an enjoyer of the finer things. Though to be fair, he may also sing along to other genres and those moments just didn’t go viral like this one. At least, he should, because he has a gorgeous voice.

@BestRecipesUK/Twitter

As the melody swells, Hugo moves closer to the TV. He greets the final notes with an enthusiastic tail wag and screen sniff. I’m willing to bet that if it gets this cute of a reaction, opera music plays all the time in this household.

Watch the enchanting video below:

https://twitter.com/BestRecipesUK/status/1289487521143877638

Hugo’s operatic debut was so popular, it even made its way to the news. He enjoyed watching that on TV as well. Even though they may not “watch” the same way we do, dogs can respond to things happening on television. They can identify sounds and shapes from the TV.

As this budding young opera star will surely achieve great stardom, start following him on his personal Instagram now. He has a YouTube account too!

@BestRecipesUK/Twitter

More Than A Musical Talent

Hugo is more than just an amazing musical talent and beloved family member. On Best Recipes UK’s website, Fox counts Hugo as an important member of her team. She writes:

“He just loves everything about food and is my apprentice taste tester.  There have never been any complaints, his favourite dishes are beef stew, cottage pie and lamb roast.”

In addition to singing and food, Hugo is enthusiastic about the beach, stuffed bears, and cuddling. He especially loves spending time with his mom.

“He is also my companion on morning walks on the beach dreaming up new recipes.”

@bestdogslifeuk/Instagram

Hopefully, we’ll be seeing more of Hugo’s lovely singing in the future.

H/T: CapitalFM
Featured Image: @BestRecipesUK/Twitter

The post Dog Sings Emotional Duet Along With Opera On TV appeared first on iHeartDogs.com.

85-Year-Old Man Reunited With His Best Friend A Month After He Disappeared

Springer Spaniel LostSpringer Spaniel Lost

85-year-old Sean Garrigan feared that his Springer Spaniel named Brandy had been stolen. The 12-year-old pup had never tried to run away before, so Sean suspected that something was very wrong when the loyal dog vanished. Sean and his son, Aidan, searched long and hard to find Brandy. Yet, all hope seemed lost as weeks went by.

Sean was heartbroken without Brandy, and he tried not to get his hopes up. But while he was fearing the worst, Brandy was out there trying to find his way home.

Springer Spaniel OutsideSpringer Spaniel Outside
Image: Aidan Garrigan Facebook

Brandy’s Journey Home

Sean and Aidan suspected that Brandy was snatched from Sean’s farm in Ireland. They searched every place nearby and even turned to Facebook for help. As time went on, everyone feared the worst for poor Brandy. After all, there was an increase in stolen dogs in the area.

Officers kept an eye out for Brandy throughout the search. Eventually, about a month later, they located the lost dog at a property about 30 miles from Sean’s home. When Sean received the call, he was hesitant at first. But once they scanned the Spaniel for a microchip, they confirmed that the dog was Brandy. Sean couldn’t believe it!

“Brandy is more to me than just a dog,” said Sean. “He is my reason to get up in the morning and the reason I feel safe at night. I’m over the moon to get my best friend back.”

Man Petting DogMan Petting Dog
Image: Aidan Garrigan Facebook

It’s unclear who stole Brandy and where Brandy has been all this time. However, none of that matters to Sean now. All he cares about is that his beloved dog is safe and healthy.

Reunited at Last

Brandy couldn’t contain his excitement after being reunited with his dad again. The pup ran around and gave his dad lots of love. But Sean was still so shocked that he was at a loss for words. All this time he feared that Brandy was gone forever, but now life could go back to normal.

“Brandy saw him and the tail started wagging immediately and he ran to him,” said Aidan. “When we got home he just ran around and around the garden. You could see the joy in the dog’s face and Dad was, I think initially, just overwhelmed.”

Dog Running ForwardDog Running Forward
Image: Aidan Garrigan Facebook

Aidan shared the good news on Facebook. He has also been using social media to help other families find their lost dogs again. Not knowing your dog’s location is a scary feeling, and Aidan and Sean want to make sure no one else has to experience this. Oftentimes, support is the best way to help a dog come home.

Sean and Brandy have had many interviews following this event. If anything, Sean encourages others to never give up hope, no matter how scary it can be. There’s always a chance that a lost dog will find their way home, especially if they have a microchip.

Man and His DogMan and His Dog
Image: Aidan Garrigan Facebook

H/T: irishpost.com
Featured Image: Aidan Garrigan Facebook

The post 85-Year-Old Man Reunited With His Best Friend A Month After He Disappeared appeared first on iHeartDogs.com.

Puppy Mills and the Inadequacy of the Animal Welfare Act

Here’s something that all of us can agree on: No one should ever buy a puppy from a puppy mill. Puppy mills are horrific and should be put out of business. 

An estimated 2 million puppies are “produced” annually in puppy mills in the U.S. Since the number of dogs who are euthanized by shelters in this country every year is estimated to be 1.2 million, you can see why simply shutting down puppy mills is such an alluring idea to those of us who have worked in shelters. But it’s difficult to put an end to any practice that some people profit from, no matter how cruel it is.

That’s why we try to educate people – to make sure they understand, first of all, that any “purebred” or “designer-mix” puppy that’s for sale in a pet shop has been produced by a puppy mill, no matter what the store employees have been told to say. 

We also try to make would-be buyers understand that when they pay for a puppy from a pet store, they are directly supporting canine suffering at the hands of all the shady breeders, brokers, and scammers that supply pet stores. 

Most of us have seen photos and videos taken by animal protection groups following a raid on the worst kind of puppy mill, where the living conditions of the dogs are unspeakably horrendous, with cages crammed with sore-covered dogs stacked on top of more cages, and all of them full of filth. No one would argue for ”businesses” like this to be allowed to continue operation.

It’s much more difficult to recognize the cruelty of puppy mills that advertise how many veterinarians they have on staff, discuss their healthcare and socialization programs, and display pictures of shiny-clean facilities alongside their United States Department of Agriculture (USDA) licenses. The conditions look better – but their breeder dogs are still puppy-producing machines who have no semblance of quality of life. And the puppies will be sold to anyone willing to pay for them and shipped anywhere in the country at too-early ages. 

The bottom line for mills is that puppies are simply “products” – and the puppy miller’s bottom line will always be more important than the welfare of the dogs.

The USDA’s Animal Welfare Act (AWA) establishes legal requirements for the care, handling, housing, transportation, and sale of animals at licensed breeding facilities. Puppy-millers and their downstream co-conspirators like to claim that their USDA licenses and unannounced AWA compliance inspections keep the industry honest. But the reality is, these laws are woefully inadequate. For example, under the AWA: 

• There is no limit to the number of dogs on the premises. A puppy mill could have hundreds or even thousands of dogs.

• There is no minimum requirement for the number of staff that must be available to care for the dogs.

• Dogs may be kept in stacked cages.

• Mesh or wire flooring is allowed.

• Dogs may be forced to relieve themselves in their cages.

• Dogs may be confined in spaces only six inches longer than their bodies, not including the tail.

• A dog may be caged 24 hours a day for his or her entire life, only removed from the cage to be bred.

• There is no exercise requirement if dogs are housed with other dogs and minimum size requirements are met for the dog’s enclosure.

• Dogs can be housed indoors or out with minimal temperature regulation.

• Human interaction is not required.

• Breeding females at the first heat cycle and every heat cycle thereafter is permissible.

• Unwanted animals may auctioned off or killed in a variety of ways.

• There is no transparency to consumers or the public about the results of USDA inspections.

And finally, it should be obvious that the USDA can’t adequately inspect the entire puppy mill industry; currently there are only an estimated 110 inspectors on staff to inspect all the animal facilities under its supervision, including zoos and research labs, in addition to commercial dog breeders and brokers. 

The post Puppy Mills and the Inadequacy of the Animal Welfare Act appeared first on Whole Dog Journal.

Near Death Experiences: Will Our Dogs be Waiting For us?

At the end of our lives, loved ones—including dogs—may return.
near death experiences for animal lovers

As I raised my head up from the ground to look around, I saw my deceased dog from my childhood bounding towards me. … It was overwhelmingly wonderful. I felt completely at peace and totally happy. I was so excited to see her again, and I did not question the experience at the time. It was as if she had never died and she had always been waiting for me to wake up from my nap in the grass.

These words, taken from case reports collected by the Near-Death Experience Research Foundation, are from a young seaman who was recalling an experience that followed a life-threatening fall from a navy pier. After losing consciousness, he found himself in “an absolutely beautiful green field of grass” with his beloved canine friend.

Tags: 

Dad Who Didn’t Want Another Dog Now Tucks Rescue Pup Into Bed

Dad Tucks Dog Into BedDad Tucks Dog Into Bed

Dads are notorious for saying they don’t want a dog. Then, when they actually get to know a dog, they fall in love. Many of them won’t admit it, but they were wrong about not wanting a furry friend in the first place.

For one particular father, he had a specific reason for not wanting a dog. He recently lost a four-legged family member, and he insisted that he didn’t want another. His daughter, Alice Garrido Gallardo, knew the truth, though. She knew that deep down, her dad still wanted a dog to love, but he would never admit it on his own. So, he just needed a little push.

Cute Rescue DogCute Rescue Dog
Image: Screenshot, @alicegrgl/TikTok

Man’s Best Friend

A stray pup named Jean Grey lived most of her life all alone. When she crossed paths with a kind stranger, they decided to help her find a home. They introduced her to Gallardo, who they knew was a huge animal lover. Gallardo would’ve loved to adopt Jean Grey herself, but she knew someone that would love her even more. Her dad.

Gallardo’s dad was uninterested in adopting the dog when he first heard about her. He acted as if he had no interest in even meeting her. But Gallardo knew better.

Dog Destroying CouchDog Destroying Couch
Image: Screenshot, @alicegrgl/TikTok

“We had lost our old dog and he didn’t want another anytime soon. He was still grieving,” said Gallardo.

Gallardo knew Jean Grey could cheer her dad up if he just gave her a chance. So, she organized a time for the two to meet each other. As expected, it was like love at first sight. He fell in love with Jean Grey the moment he met her.

An Unbreakable Bond

Jean Grey and her dad have grown closer every day since he adopted her. They truly are the perfect story of a rescue dog and the dad who said he didn’t want another dog. In fact, the two of them even have a special bedtime routine now.

Dad and Dog Bedtime RoutineDad and Dog Bedtime Routine
Image: Screenshot, @alicegrgl/TikTok

Gallardo posted a video on TikTok of her dad putting Jean Grey to bed at night. It’s one of the most adorable videos you’ll ever see. First, he tucks her in with a blanket, making sure the blanket is tight and comfortable around her. Then, he gives her a pillow to rest her head. Before saying goodnight, he leaves a stuffed animal beside her for comfort. The video is set to the song “When She Loved Me” from Toy Story 2, which makes it even more heartwarming.

Losing a dog is incredibly hard, but it doesn’t mean you’ll never love another dog. There are so many dogs out there in need of a home, just like Jean Grey. It takes some time to know when you’re ready to adopt another dog. But if you choose a rescue dog, you’ll feel happy knowing you’ve saved another animal’s life.

Watch the Beautiful Video Here:

@alicegrgl

Se fue de “yo no quiero otro perro” a esto demasiado rápido 😂🤍 #perrito #pet #petlover #dog #dogsoftiktok #xyzbca

♬ when she loved me cover by katelyn lapid – katelynlapid

H/T: thedodo.com
Featured Image: Screenshots, @alicegrgl/TikTok

The post Dad Who Didn’t Want Another Dog Now Tucks Rescue Pup Into Bed appeared first on iHeartDogs.com.

Puppy Mills and the Inadequacy of the Animal Welfare Act

Here’s something that all of us can agree on: No one should ever buy a puppy from a puppy mill. Puppy mills are horrific and should be put out of business. 

An estimated 2 million puppies are “produced” annually in puppy mills in the U.S. Since the number of dogs who are euthanized by shelters in this country every year is estimated to be 1.2 million, you can see why simply shutting down puppy mills is such an alluring idea to those of us who have worked in shelters. But it’s difficult to put an end to any practice that some people profit from, no matter how cruel it is.

That’s why we try to educate people – to make sure they understand, first of all, that any “purebred” or “designer-mix” puppy that’s for sale in a pet shop has been produced by a puppy mill, no matter what the store employees have been told to say. 

We also try to make would-be buyers understand that when they pay for a puppy from a pet store, they are directly supporting canine suffering at the hands of all the shady breeders, brokers, and scammers that supply pet stores. 

Most of us have seen photos and videos taken by animal protection groups following a raid on the worst kind of puppy mill, where the living conditions of the dogs are unspeakably horrendous, with cages crammed with sore-covered dogs stacked on top of more cages, and all of them full of filth. No one would argue for ”businesses” like this to be allowed to continue operation.

It’s much more difficult to recognize the cruelty of puppy mills that advertise how many veterinarians they have on staff, discuss their healthcare and socialization programs, and display pictures of shiny-clean facilities alongside their United States Department of Agriculture (USDA) licenses. The conditions look better – but their breeder dogs are still puppy-producing machines who have no semblance of quality of life. And the puppies will be sold to anyone willing to pay for them and shipped anywhere in the country at too-early ages. 

The bottom line for mills is that puppies are simply “products” – and the puppy miller’s bottom line will always be more important than the welfare of the dogs.

The USDA’s Animal Welfare Act (AWA) establishes legal requirements for the care, handling, housing, transportation, and sale of animals at licensed breeding facilities. Puppy-millers and their downstream co-conspirators like to claim that their USDA licenses and unannounced AWA compliance inspections keep the industry honest. But the reality is, these laws are woefully inadequate. For example, under the AWA: 

• There is no limit to the number of dogs on the premises. A puppy mill could have hundreds or even thousands of dogs.

• There is no minimum requirement for the number of staff that must be available to care for the dogs.

• Dogs may be kept in stacked cages.

• Mesh or wire flooring is allowed.

• Dogs may be forced to relieve themselves in their cages.

• Dogs may be confined in spaces only six inches longer than their bodies, not including the tail.

• A dog may be caged 24 hours a day for his or her entire life, only removed from the cage to be bred.

• There is no exercise requirement if dogs are housed with other dogs and minimum size requirements are met for the dog’s enclosure.

• Dogs can be housed indoors or out with minimal temperature regulation.

• Human interaction is not required.

• Breeding females at the first heat cycle and every heat cycle thereafter is permissible.

• Unwanted animals may auctioned off or killed in a variety of ways.

• There is no transparency to consumers or the public about the results of USDA inspections.

And finally, it should be obvious that the USDA can’t adequately inspect the entire puppy mill industry; currently there are only an estimated 110 inspectors on staff to inspect all the animal facilities under its supervision, including zoos and research labs, in addition to commercial dog breeders and brokers. 

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