Canine Massage Case Reports

Aimee Johnson of Little Bear Animal Massage (littlebearanimalmassage.com) in St. Paul, MN, reports: One of my clients is a 13-year-old German Shepherd Dog, Izzy, who was referred to me by her traditional Chinese medicine (TCM) veterinarian, Dr. Deb Brown of Pequot Lakes (MN) Animal Hospital. Izzy is a former agility dog and has arthritis in her back, knees, shoulder, and neck. She also has spondylosis, hip dysplasia, and had hip denervation done in 2015. Izzy’s owner, Julie, has incorporated multiple modalities to keep Izzy moving (chiropractic, laser therapy, TCM, etc.). After adding massage to her routine (once a week with me, and nightly sessions by her owner), Izzy is doing the things she loves again.

Chantilly

Karen Lachapelle, a massage practitioner and owner of Rub My Belly (facebook.com/rbmyblly) in Lowell, MA, reports: Wendy and Marc had four dogs. The first dog of theirs that I massaged was the oldest guy, Taz. When I first met him, he was about 12 years old with just patches of fur. At first, he was unsure, but by the third or fourth session he liked his massages so much so that he would sleep through the night – and, remarkably, his fur started to grow back. I massaged Taz on a monthly basis for two years until he passed away. Then Wendy and Marc called on me to massage their next-oldest dog, Chantilly. When I massaged Chantilly, Wendy and Marc would comment on the “spring in her step” and report that she would have a good night’s sleep. I massaged Chantilly until she passed away in 2019 at the age of 19.

Bella

Ellen Kanner of Framingham, MA, shared this report: Bella is my 12-year-old Shih-Tzu/Poodle-mix. About five months ago, she stopped using her left front leg.  Her veterinarian diagnosed advanced arthritis and prescribed an injectable pain killer once a week for 10 weeks. She also advised me that massage or acupuncture may reduce Bella’s pain. I contacted Lisa Ruthig (Lively Animal Massage in Grosvenordale, CT), and she started massaging Bella once a week. Within five days of getting her first massage, Bella started walking on all four paws again! After 10 weeks, Bella no longer needed her injectable pain medication. Bella now gets massages every other week. Recently, she was able to hike at a normal pace for over an hour. Massage turned my older, pain-filled Bella into a much more comfortable “younger” Bella. 

Maggie

Karen Brothers of Bellingham, MA, shared this report: My 13-year-old German Shepherd, Maggie, has severe arthritis in the lower spine and severe hip dysplasia. Medication helped for a time, then her veterinarian recommended physical therapy or massage. After her first massage from practitioner Lisa Ruthig, Maggie slept through the night – for the first time in a while. I was so relieved! I realized that Maggie didn’t groan as much as she lay down or struggle as much when she got up. She was willing to walk farther than she had been, she didn’t seem as stiff, and her gait was better. Most amazingly, the sparkle came back to her eyes. Over the next two years, her challenges worsened, but each hour-long massage helped Maggie feel more comfortable for the remainder of the week. 

The post Canine Massage Case Reports appeared first on Whole Dog Journal.

Grief Therapy Dog Is An Official Staff Member At Funeral Home

Therapy dogs have the gift of delivering comfort and security during scary, difficult, and overwhelming times. Their efficacy at soothing sick, traumatized, and grief-stricken souls is well documented. Macon Funeral Home in Franklin, North Carolina recently added a therapy dog in training to their grief support staff. They expect Mochi to bring comfort to grieving families for years to come.

Image Macon Funeral Home

An Idea That Was Immediately Embraced by Leadership

Tori McKay is an office administrator for Macon Funeral Home. For 10 years she has been considering the prospect of incorporating animal therapy into her work in grief support. This January ushered in a new decade in her life and she felt compelled to make the leap. Tori consulted with the leadership team at the funeral home where she works, presenting evidence around animal grief therapy and her commitment to caring for the home’s therapy dog in and outside of the funeral home. Management immediately embraced the idea and gave her the green light.

Mochi is a Therapy Dog in Training

Tori and her husband adopted a Bernese Mountain Dog and named her Mochi. Tori chose the breed because,The Bernese Mountain Dog is a very loyal, affectionate and gentle animal, and has always been my choice for a potential grief therapy dog. They have a history of being excellent therapy and support dogs, which comes from their kind disposition and laid-back personalities.” Mochi will be properly trained and certified as a therapy dog once she is old enough. At just 8 weeks old, her dog mom Tori is working with her at home and at the funeral home on socialization and basic obedience training. 

Image Macon Funeral Home/Facebook

Mochi is Already Making a Difference

Tori understands that the life expectancy of Bernese Mountain Dogs is short at just 6-8 years. This is not unusual for giant breeds. Tori wants Mochi’s life to be as purposeful as possible and she is already getting started. Tori publicly invited members of the community to come by the funeral home and meet Mochi, who “loves making new friends.” After announcing that Mochi was a part of the Macon Funeral Home team, Tori received requests for grief therapy and a hugely supportive response from social media. Moving forward, Tori will be making Mochi available to families upon request to work funeral visitations or be present during grief therapy sessions. Tori also plans to bring Mochi to work at nursing homes a few times a month.

H/T newschannel5.com 
Featured Image Macon Funeral Home

The post Grief Therapy Dog Is An Official Staff Member At Funeral Home appeared first on iHeartDogs.com.

PPG Summit 2020 Sessions: Building Positive Boundaries for the Refined Suburban Canine – Teaching Dogs to Enjoy Their Yards without the Need for Electronic Devices

BARKS presents session details from PPG’s 2020 Summit and Workshops in Phoenix, Arizona
*Early bird discount available if you register before January 31, 2020!

© Niki Tudge
© Judy Luther

Session Details:
Presenters: Judy Luther and Niki Tudge
Session Title: Building Positive Boundaries for the Refined Suburban Canine – Teaching Dogs to Enjoy Their Yards without the Need for Electronic Devices
Session Type:  Lecture (1.5 Hours)

Electric fences as containment tools are very common in our residential communities. Many locations restrict or ban the use of physical fences leaving pet owners with little choice but to install underground electronic containment tools. However, discerning pet owners are misguided in the level of protection these tools offer and the potential for them to cause untold physical and mental discomfort and damage to their pets.

This session will provide a step-by-step standard operating procedure (SOP) you can offer through your business as a much-needed service. The presenters will break the SOP down into individual skills and required knowledge, giving you the perfect program to help you support your clients with their containment needs in a positive and empowering manner. The session will cover the prerequisite skills for both dog and owner, the supplies you will need, and how the training program can be delivered over several lessons.

The session will also include a troubleshooting guide and suggest systems you can implement to help you convert electronically contained yards into a positive environment for pets who were previously conditioned to an electric fence.

Learning Objectives:

  • Understand the SOP in its format and style so you can implement the service in your business.
  • Grasp the step-by-step process to teach dogs to stay in their yards without the use of electric fences or, in fact, any designated location.
  • Learn how to overcome any hesitations about using this method from a safety aspect.
  • Understand how the procedure can be implemented over several lessons with the support of the presenters’ training curriculum and lesson plan.
  • Be comfortable with the supporting tools, videos and client handouts to assist you in your delivery.

PPG Summit 2020 will take place in Phoenix, Arizona and offer two unique programs:

Program 1: The Four-Day Summit
Program 2: The Four-Day Summit + Daily Off-Site Workshops at the Arizona Humane Society

Dates: Friday, September 18 – Tuesday, September 22, 2020

Event theme: Collaborative Care and Enrichment – Creating Partnerships for Positive Results

Quick Links
Event Schedule
Workshop Groups
Presenters and Workshop Instructors
Sponsorship Opportunities
Register

PPG Summit 2020 Sessions: Building Positive Boundaries for the Refined Suburban Canine – Teaching Dogs to Enjoy Their Yards without the Need for Electronic Devices

BARKS presents session details from PPG’s 2020 Summit and Workshops in Phoenix, Arizona
*Early bird discount available if you register before January 31, 2020!

© Niki Tudge
© Judy Luther

Session Details:
Presenters: Judy Luther and Niki Tudge
Session Title: Building Positive Boundaries for the Refined Suburban Canine – Teaching Dogs to Enjoy Their Yards without the Need for Electronic Devices
Session Type:  Lecture (1.5 Hours)

Electric fences as containment tools are very common in our residential communities. Many locations restrict or ban the use of physical fences leaving pet owners with little choice but to install underground electronic containment tools. However, discerning pet owners are misguided in the level of protection these tools offer and the potential for them to cause untold physical and mental discomfort and damage to their pets.

This session will provide a step-by-step standard operating procedure (SOP) you can offer through your business as a much-needed service. The presenters will break the SOP down into individual skills and required knowledge, giving you the perfect program to help you support your clients with their containment needs in a positive and empowering manner. The session will cover the prerequisite skills for both dog and owner, the supplies you will need, and how the training program can be delivered over several lessons.

The session will also include a troubleshooting guide and suggest systems you can implement to help you convert electronically contained yards into a positive environment for pets who were previously conditioned to an electric fence.

Learning Objectives:

  • Understand the SOP in its format and style so you can implement the service in your business.
  • Grasp the step-by-step process to teach dogs to stay in their yards without the use of electric fences or, in fact, any designated location.
  • Learn how to overcome any hesitations about using this method from a safety aspect.
  • Understand how the procedure can be implemented over several lessons with the support of the presenters’ training curriculum and lesson plan.
  • Be comfortable with the supporting tools, videos and client handouts to assist you in your delivery.

PPG Summit 2020 will take place in Phoenix, Arizona and offer two unique programs:

Program 1: The Four-Day Summit
Program 2: The Four-Day Summit + Daily Off-Site Workshops at the Arizona Humane Society

Dates: Friday, September 18 – Tuesday, September 22, 2020

Event theme: Collaborative Care and Enrichment – Creating Partnerships for Positive Results

Quick Links
Event Schedule
Workshop Groups
Presenters and Workshop Instructors
Sponsorship Opportunities
Register

Deaf Great Dane Hilariously Protests His Right To Swim

Remember when you were a kid and your parents wouldn’t let you go swimming? It was soul-crushing, heartbreaking, and downright cruel! Okay, maybe that’s a little bit dramatic but we know one pup that agrees! The bigger the dog, the bigger the tantrum so you can imagine the kind of tantrums that a Great Dane can have!

A Pouty, Pool Party Loving Pooch

Max was an avid swimmer and mischief-maker. When he didn’t get his way, everyone was going to hear about it! Max was caught lurking around the pool one day. He was deaf but that didn’t mean he didn’t know his boundaries.

Max’s mom repeatedly told him that he wasn’t allowed to go for a dip but Max wasn’t having it. The gentle giant was wearing a sleeve on his front leg and it’s unclear why. What we do know, however, is that he was determined that it wouldn’t stop him from taking his afternoon swim!

@MaxAndKatieTheGreatDanes/Facebook

It can get blistering hot in Florida where Max lived. Even Winter months can soar toward 90 degrees. It’s no wonder Max wanted to cool off so badly. Normally, Max could have been found lounging on the pool steps wearing his stylish fedora. He was quite the ladies’ man! Despite reading his mom’s body language the day of his pouty pool protest, Max proceeded to dip his paw into the water as if he was testing the temperature… and his mom’s patience!

She again told him he wasn’t allowed in and his wails of protest grew louder and louder! Max’s overdramatic response was Oscar-worthy. His howls of angst outdid any role you’ve ever seen come out of Hollywood.

@MaxAndKatieTheGreatDanes/Facebook

Max’s Legacy And Spunky Personality Lives On

Max has since crossed the Rainbow Bridge. He had quite the personality that his mom documented on the Facebook page, Max & Katie The Great Danes. Now that Max and Katie are both gone, there are Mikey and Ellie. Mikey especially has a personality that would give Max and run for his money! He is always finding himself at the center of mischief and the only one who can put Mikey in his place is the cat that he shares a house with.

@MaxAndKatieTheGreatDanes/Facebook

Mikey is a scone thief, a bed hog, an Amazon package pirate and a pizza fiend. He helps deliver groceries from the car to the kitchen, but he always makes sure he is rewarded with a little snack. And, just like his brother Max, Mikey has one black spot in the middle of his nose.

Check out the hilarious video of Max!

h/t: @MaxandKatietheGreatDanes/Rumble
Featured Photo: @Max&KatieTheGreatDanes/Facebook

The post Deaf Great Dane Hilariously Protests His Right To Swim appeared first on iHeartDogs.com.

Meat and Meat Meal: Sorting Through Animal Protein Sources

A few years ago, we added a new column to the chart full of information that we publish in our annual “approved dry dog foods” list in the February issue. The column tabulates how many dog foods made by each company on the list were made with meat only, meat meal only, and/or a combination of meat and meat meal.

These tabulations do not constitute a judgment about the products listed; they are simply information for dog owners who understand the differences between the terms and the inferences that one can make from that information. But it has come to our attention that many of you aren’t aware of what, exactly, you can infer about a pet food company – or an individual product – from its inclusion of meat, meal, or both on its ingredients panel. So let’s clear this up!

NAMING AND SHAMING

First, though, you need to understand that, for the purposes of this article, when we use the generic phrases “meat” and “meat meal,” we are discussing named meats: chicken and chicken meal, pork and pork meal, beef and beef meal, etc. We don’t include any products on our “approved foods” lists that utilize unspecified protein sources on the ingredients label. When an unnamed animal protein source appears on the ingredients panel, the consumer has no idea of what mammal or type of poultry is in the can or bag.

To repeat: If you see one of the following phrases on the ingredients list of a dog food, you won’t see that dog food on our “approved foods” lists: meat, meat by-products, meat meal, meat and bone meal, poultry, poultry by-products, poultry meal, poultry by-products meal. 

 Each of these words or phrases have legal definitions when they appear on an ingredient panel. Lacking a word that indicates the species of animal has contributed the “meat” in question, the buyer has no way of knowing what they might be feeding their dog. Is it beef? Lamb? Pork? Chicken? Whatever leftover animal protein source the manufacturer can buy on sale? There is no way to know. 

MEATY ISSUES

What we are discussing here and now, though, is the difference between named meats and their named meat meal corollaries. What’s the difference between chicken and chicken meal, beef and beef meal, etc.? 

There is a critical clock ticking when it comes to fresh and frozen meats and meat by-products. Refrigeration is costly – and doesn’t hold off degradation of the ingredients for long. Freezing preserves meats longer, but is several factors more costly than refrigeration. Companies that use fresh meats in their pet foods need to get those ingredients into their mixers and extruders quickly; the more time it takes to get from the meat-processing plant to the food-manufacturing plant, the costlier the ingredients become.

If the meat products are not refrigerated or frozen, their quality is heavily impacted by the time and distance it takes them to travel to either a rendering company or a pet food manufacturer. The longer it takes them to be cooked in one form or another, the more bacterial decay and enzymatic breakdown will occur, affecting the quality of the protein and fat. 

Pet food makers need to test and control a slew of quality-indicated parameters to make sure the meat-based ingredients are of sufficient quality to be safe, nutritious, and palatable. The quality of the product can be determined by the color and smell of the material, as well as analytical values for protein, available lysine, total lysine, methionine, pepsin digestibility (higher values are equated with higher protein content), peroxide value (higher values mean greater rancidity of the fats), OSI value (indicates the oxidative stability of the fats), ash (more on that in a minute), level and type of amino acids they contain.

MAKE A MEAL OF IT

The ash content in a pet food corresponds almost entirely to the amount of bone that is included in the product’s animal protein sources; it consists of the minerals that would be left if you burned everything in a food that would burn. Foods with an adequate amount of calcium, phosphorus, and other minerals they need – but no more – may contain as little as 2% ash. Super inexpensive, low-quality foods may contain as much as 10% ash, indicating that they were made with animal protein sources that included a lot of bone. Most dog foods contain between 5% and 8% ash. 

Meat meals are made through a process called rendering. The process is named “rendering” as it renders volatile, degradable meats into a more stable form. The animal products are subjected to high temperatures, both in order to kill any pathogens and to drive a certain amount of moisture and fat away from the bone and tissue. 

Once the product is in a lower-moisture form (around 10%), it will remain relatively stable at room temperatures for months. Meat meals can be shipped and stored for some time, until the pet food producer is ready to make some food. 

For these reasons, the smaller the annual sales of a pet food brand, the less frequently it will be made, the more likely it is that the product will be made with meat meals, rather than fresh meats. Meat from exotic species that are in limited supply (perhaps only seasonally) is almost always supplied in the form of a rendered meal. 

Competent rendering companies can produce meat meals with a range of fat and “ash” content, and pet food companies will stipulate how much fat and ash they want in the ingredients they buy from the renderer. In general, higher-fat ingredients will cost more than lower-fat ingredients. Lower-ash ingredients cost more than high-ash ingredients. 

MEAT-ONLY FOODS

There are companies that have staked their entire reputations on the fact that they use only meats, never meat meals, in their dry dog foods. Is this truly a sign of higher quality? 

Actually, there’s something to look out for in those “meat only” (meal-free) dry dog foods: the inclusion (and frequently, the over-representation) of plant-sourced proteins, which have a less desirable amino acid profile than meat (for dogs). 

Remember, ingredients are listed on the label in order of pre-processing weight in the food’s formula. Meat contains about 70% moisture and is very heavy, so if it is included in a large enough quantity so as to appear first or second on the ingredient list, it can’t actually be supplying the majority of the product’s protein. This is because the meats that are used in pet food – which actually contain quite a bit of skin, fat, connective tissue, and bone – may contain as little as 8% protein.

In foods that contain both meat and meat meal high on the ingredients list, it’s the meat meal that supplies most of the protein in the product. If there is no meat meal in a dry dog food, it has to have some plant protein sources to boost the protein content to adequate levels. We couldn’t say, then, that we feel these meat-only dry dog food formulations are better. 

IMPOSSIBLE TO CONFIRM

We’re sorry to say it, but the factors that most affect the quality of the meat ingredients in dog foods are absolutely impossible to confirm. The source of the ingredients, whether they are kept chilled, the distance to the rendering plant or food-production facility, the amount of time it takes for those ingredients to be processed . . . none of these things are verifiable by consumers (or journalists, in case you were wondering). 

Giant conglomerate food companies actually have an advantage here, in that many have rendering and/or pet food manufacturing facilities adjacent to their human food processing facilities, sparing the meat and meat by-products a long journey at the local air temperature. 

That said, there must be smaller companies that have located their manufacturing facilities conveniently close to their animal-protein suppliers. And we know that some pet food makers do keep their meat ingredients chilled all the way between the slaughterhouse to their pet food mixing and extrusion or canning equipment. But these facts are difficult to verify and subject to change at a moment’s notice. Consumers (us included) are stuck with having to trust the reputation of the company and performance of the products themselves. 

The post Meat and Meat Meal: Sorting Through Animal Protein Sources appeared first on Whole Dog Journal.

Meat and Meat Meal: Sorting Through Animal Protein Sources

A few years ago, we added a new column to the chart full of information that we publish in our annual “approved dry dog foods” list in the February issue. The column tabulates how many dog foods made by each company on the list were made with meat only, meat meal only, and/or a combination of meat and meat meal.

These tabulations do not constitute a judgment about the products listed; they are simply information for dog owners who understand the differences between the terms and the inferences that one can make from that information. But it has come to our attention that many of you aren’t aware of what, exactly, you can infer about a pet food company – or an individual product – from its inclusion of meat, meal, or both on its ingredients panel. So let’s clear this up!

NAMING AND SHAMING

First, though, you need to understand that, for the purposes of this article, when we use the generic phrases “meat” and “meat meal,” we are discussing named meats: chicken and chicken meal, pork and pork meal, beef and beef meal, etc. We don’t include any products on our “approved foods” lists that utilize unspecified protein sources on the ingredients label. When an unnamed animal protein source appears on the ingredients panel, the consumer has no idea of what mammal or type of poultry is in the can or bag.

To repeat: If you see one of the following phrases on the ingredients list of a dog food, you won’t see that dog food on our “approved foods” lists: meat, meat by-products, meat meal, meat and bone meal, poultry, poultry by-products, poultry meal, poultry by-products meal. 

 Each of these words or phrases have legal definitions when they appear on an ingredient panel. Lacking a word that indicates the species of animal has contributed the “meat” in question, the buyer has no way of knowing what they might be feeding their dog. Is it beef? Lamb? Pork? Chicken? Whatever leftover animal protein source the manufacturer can buy on sale? There is no way to know. 

MEATY ISSUES

What we are discussing here and now, though, is the difference between named meats and their named meat meal corollaries. What’s the difference between chicken and chicken meal, beef and beef meal, etc.? 

There is a critical clock ticking when it comes to fresh and frozen meats and meat by-products. Refrigeration is costly – and doesn’t hold off degradation of the ingredients for long. Freezing preserves meats longer, but is several factors more costly than refrigeration. Companies that use fresh meats in their pet foods need to get those ingredients into their mixers and extruders quickly; the more time it takes to get from the meat-processing plant to the food-manufacturing plant, the costlier the ingredients become.

If the meat products are not refrigerated or frozen, their quality is heavily impacted by the time and distance it takes them to travel to either a rendering company or a pet food manufacturer. The longer it takes them to be cooked in one form or another, the more bacterial decay and enzymatic breakdown will occur, affecting the quality of the protein and fat. 

Pet food makers need to test and control a slew of quality-indicated parameters to make sure the meat-based ingredients are of sufficient quality to be safe, nutritious, and palatable. The quality of the product can be determined by the color and smell of the material, as well as analytical values for protein, available lysine, total lysine, methionine, pepsin digestibility (higher values are equated with higher protein content), peroxide value (higher values mean greater rancidity of the fats), OSI value (indicates the oxidative stability of the fats), ash (more on that in a minute), level and type of amino acids they contain.

MAKE A MEAL OF IT

The ash content in a pet food corresponds almost entirely to the amount of bone that is included in the product’s animal protein sources; it consists of the minerals that would be left if you burned everything in a food that would burn. Foods with an adequate amount of calcium, phosphorus, and other minerals they need – but no more – may contain as little as 2% ash. Super inexpensive, low-quality foods may contain as much as 10% ash, indicating that they were made with animal protein sources that included a lot of bone. Most dog foods contain between 5% and 8% ash. 

Meat meals are made through a process called rendering. The process is named “rendering” as it renders volatile, degradable meats into a more stable form. The animal products are subjected to high temperatures, both in order to kill any pathogens and to drive a certain amount of moisture and fat away from the bone and tissue. 

Once the product is in a lower-moisture form (around 10%), it will remain relatively stable at room temperatures for months. Meat meals can be shipped and stored for some time, until the pet food producer is ready to make some food. 

For these reasons, the smaller the annual sales of a pet food brand, the less frequently it will be made, the more likely it is that the product will be made with meat meals, rather than fresh meats. Meat from exotic species that are in limited supply (perhaps only seasonally) is almost always supplied in the form of a rendered meal. 

Competent rendering companies can produce meat meals with a range of fat and “ash” content, and pet food companies will stipulate how much fat and ash they want in the ingredients they buy from the renderer. In general, higher-fat ingredients will cost more than lower-fat ingredients. Lower-ash ingredients cost more than high-ash ingredients. 

MEAT-ONLY FOODS

There are companies that have staked their entire reputations on the fact that they use only meats, never meat meals, in their dry dog foods. Is this truly a sign of higher quality? 

Actually, there’s something to look out for in those “meat only” (meal-free) dry dog foods: the inclusion (and frequently, the over-representation) of plant-sourced proteins, which have a less desirable amino acid profile than meat (for dogs). 

Remember, ingredients are listed on the label in order of pre-processing weight in the food’s formula. Meat contains about 70% moisture and is very heavy, so if it is included in a large enough quantity so as to appear first or second on the ingredient list, it can’t actually be supplying the majority of the product’s protein. This is because the meats that are used in pet food – which actually contain quite a bit of skin, fat, connective tissue, and bone – may contain as little as 8% protein.

In foods that contain both meat and meat meal high on the ingredients list, it’s the meat meal that supplies most of the protein in the product. If there is no meat meal in a dry dog food, it has to have some plant protein sources to boost the protein content to adequate levels. We couldn’t say, then, that we feel these meat-only dry dog food formulations are better. 

IMPOSSIBLE TO CONFIRM

We’re sorry to say it, but the factors that most affect the quality of the meat ingredients in dog foods are absolutely impossible to confirm. The source of the ingredients, whether they are kept chilled, the distance to the rendering plant or food-production facility, the amount of time it takes for those ingredients to be processed . . . none of these things are verifiable by consumers (or journalists, in case you were wondering). 

Giant conglomerate food companies actually have an advantage here, in that many have rendering and/or pet food manufacturing facilities adjacent to their human food processing facilities, sparing the meat and meat by-products a long journey at the local air temperature. 

That said, there must be smaller companies that have located their manufacturing facilities conveniently close to their animal-protein suppliers. And we know that some pet food makers do keep their meat ingredients chilled all the way between the slaughterhouse to their pet food mixing and extrusion or canning equipment. But these facts are difficult to verify and subject to change at a moment’s notice. Consumers (us included) are stuck with having to trust the reputation of the company and performance of the products themselves. 

The post Meat and Meat Meal: Sorting Through Animal Protein Sources appeared first on Whole Dog Journal.

Dog Wins Connect 4 Game Against His Mom

Dogs are the best companions. Whether you just want to sit around and snuggle or run around and play, dogs always want to be there with you. However, for a smart Cockapoo named Percy, play time is more than just squeaky toys.

Percy’s favorite game is Connect 4, and he gets better at it every time he plays. He might even be better at it than most people are!

Percy loves when his mom, Sarah Shapiro-Ward, teaches him new tricks. Shapiro-Ward is a dog trainer with When Hounds Fly, so she loves to challenge her own smart pup. Percy is only 2 years old, but he knows so many exciting tricks!

Image: @prancing_percy/Instagram

Percy has been working on his Connect 4 skills for a while now, and he has finally figured out how to master the game. His mom is very proud of his success, so she always posts videos of his talents on his very own Instagram page. It makes everyone wish that our own dogs could play strategy games with us!

Percy’s Viral Connect 4 Game

Learning to play Connect 4 was a difficult process, but it didn’t take long for Percy to pick up on the basics. He knows how to carefully pick up a chip in his mouth and place it into the Connect 4 grid. Without thumbs, it’s a bit harder to play, but that doesn’t stop this determined pup!

Shapiro-Ward admits that even though Percy is very talented at playing the game, he’s not very strategic. He just plays to have fun!

“Once the token has gone in, he doesn’t know it’s there anymore,” said Shapiro-Ward. “But he likes to play, so I cheer him on.”

Image: Screenshot, @prancing_percy/Instagram

In his most popular Connect 4 video, he even beats his mom with a diagonal! Of course, Shapiro-Ward goes a little easy on him, but he still won fair and square! His mom cheers him on the whole time, making him even more excited to play. 

“It’s your turn,” Shapiro-Ward tells him in the video. “Good job! Yeah, good play! Nice move, buddy!”

Percy isn’t the first dog to learn how to play a human game, but he’s one of the most talented. Each time he plays the game, he gets even better. Maybe if he keeps trying, he’ll really be able to outsmart his mom!

Next time you’re feeling bored at home, why not try to teach your dog to play a fun game? They might just surprise you! If not, playing fetch is just as fun!

Watch the incredible video below:

H/T: nypost.com
Featured Image: Screenshot, @prancing_percy/Instagram

The post Dog Wins Connect 4 Game Against His Mom appeared first on iHeartDogs.com.

PPG Summit 2020 Sessions: Building Positive Boundaries for the Refined Suburban Canine – Teaching Dogs to Enjoy Their Yards without the Need for Electronic Devices

BARKS presents session details from PPG’s 2020 Summit and Workshops in Phoenix, Arizona
*Early bird discount available if you register before January 31, 2020!

© Niki Tudge
© Judy Luther

Session Details:
Presenters: Judy Luther and Niki Tudge
Session Title: Building Positive Boundaries for the Refined Suburban Canine – Teaching Dogs to Enjoy Their Yards without the Need for Electronic Devices
Session Type:  Lecture (1.5 Hours)

Electric fences as containment tools are very common in our residential communities. Many locations restrict or ban the use of physical fences leaving pet owners with little choice but to install underground electronic containment tools. However, discerning pet owners are misguided in the level of protection these tools offer and the potential for them to cause untold physical and mental discomfort and damage to their pets.

This session will provide a step-by-step standard operating procedure (SOP) you can offer through your business as a much-needed service. The presenters will break the SOP down into individual skills and required knowledge, giving you the perfect program to help you support your clients with their containment needs in a positive and empowering manner. The session will cover the prerequisite skills for both dog and owner, the supplies you will need, and how the training program can be delivered over several lessons.

The session will also include a troubleshooting guide and suggest systems you can implement to help you convert electronically contained yards into a positive environment for pets who were previously conditioned to an electric fence.

Learning Objectives:

  • Understand the SOP in its format and style so you can implement the service in your business.
  • Grasp the step-by-step process to teach dogs to stay in their yards without the use of electric fences or, in fact, any designated location.
  • Learn how to overcome any hesitations about using this method from a safety aspect.
  • Understand how the procedure can be implemented over several lessons with the support of the presenters’ training curriculum and lesson plan.
  • Be comfortable with the supporting tools, videos and client handouts to assist you in your delivery.

PPG Summit 2020 will take place in Phoenix, Arizona and offer two unique programs:

Program 1: The Four-Day Summit
Program 2: The Four-Day Summit + Daily Off-Site Workshops at the Arizona Humane Society

Dates: Friday, September 18 – Tuesday, September 22, 2020

Event theme: Collaborative Care and Enrichment – Creating Partnerships for Positive Results

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PPG Summit 2020 Sessions: Building Positive Boundaries for the Refined Suburban Canine – Teaching Dogs to Enjoy Their Yards without the Need for Electronic Devices

BARKS presents session details from PPG’s 2020 Summit and Workshops in Phoenix, Arizona
*Early bird discount available if you register before January 31, 2020!

© Niki Tudge
© Judy Luther

Session Details:
Presenters: Judy Luther and Niki Tudge
Session Title: Building Positive Boundaries for the Refined Suburban Canine – Teaching Dogs to Enjoy Their Yards without the Need for Electronic Devices
Session Type:  Lecture (1.5 Hours)

Electric fences as containment tools are very common in our residential communities. Many locations restrict or ban the use of physical fences leaving pet owners with little choice but to install underground electronic containment tools. However, discerning pet owners are misguided in the level of protection these tools offer and the potential for them to cause untold physical and mental discomfort and damage to their pets.

This session will provide a step-by-step standard operating procedure (SOP) you can offer through your business as a much-needed service. The presenters will break the SOP down into individual skills and required knowledge, giving you the perfect program to help you support your clients with their containment needs in a positive and empowering manner. The session will cover the prerequisite skills for both dog and owner, the supplies you will need, and how the training program can be delivered over several lessons.

The session will also include a troubleshooting guide and suggest systems you can implement to help you convert electronically contained yards into a positive environment for pets who were previously conditioned to an electric fence.

Learning Objectives:

  • Understand the SOP in its format and style so you can implement the service in your business.
  • Grasp the step-by-step process to teach dogs to stay in their yards without the use of electric fences or, in fact, any designated location.
  • Learn how to overcome any hesitations about using this method from a safety aspect.
  • Understand how the procedure can be implemented over several lessons with the support of the presenters’ training curriculum and lesson plan.
  • Be comfortable with the supporting tools, videos and client handouts to assist you in your delivery.

PPG Summit 2020 will take place in Phoenix, Arizona and offer two unique programs:

Program 1: The Four-Day Summit
Program 2: The Four-Day Summit + Daily Off-Site Workshops at the Arizona Humane Society

Dates: Friday, September 18 – Tuesday, September 22, 2020

Event theme: Collaborative Care and Enrichment – Creating Partnerships for Positive Results

Quick Links
Event Schedule
Workshop Groups
Presenters and Workshop Instructors
Sponsorship Opportunities
Register