Puppy Mills and the Inadequacy of the Animal Welfare Act

Here’s something that all of us can agree on: No one should ever buy a puppy from a puppy mill. Puppy mills are horrific and should be put out of business. 

An estimated 2 million puppies are “produced” annually in puppy mills in the U.S. Since the number of dogs who are euthanized by shelters in this country every year is estimated to be 1.2 million, you can see why simply shutting down puppy mills is such an alluring idea to those of us who have worked in shelters. But it’s difficult to put an end to any practice that some people profit from, no matter how cruel it is.

That’s why we try to educate people – to make sure they understand, first of all, that any “purebred” or “designer-mix” puppy that’s for sale in a pet shop has been produced by a puppy mill, no matter what the store employees have been told to say. 

We also try to make would-be buyers understand that when they pay for a puppy from a pet store, they are directly supporting canine suffering at the hands of all the shady breeders, brokers, and scammers that supply pet stores. 

Most of us have seen photos and videos taken by animal protection groups following a raid on the worst kind of puppy mill, where the living conditions of the dogs are unspeakably horrendous, with cages crammed with sore-covered dogs stacked on top of more cages, and all of them full of filth. No one would argue for ”businesses” like this to be allowed to continue operation.

It’s much more difficult to recognize the cruelty of puppy mills that advertise how many veterinarians they have on staff, discuss their healthcare and socialization programs, and display pictures of shiny-clean facilities alongside their United States Department of Agriculture (USDA) licenses. The conditions look better – but their breeder dogs are still puppy-producing machines who have no semblance of quality of life. And the puppies will be sold to anyone willing to pay for them and shipped anywhere in the country at too-early ages. 

The bottom line for mills is that puppies are simply “products” – and the puppy miller’s bottom line will always be more important than the welfare of the dogs.

The USDA’s Animal Welfare Act (AWA) establishes legal requirements for the care, handling, housing, transportation, and sale of animals at licensed breeding facilities. Puppy-millers and their downstream co-conspirators like to claim that their USDA licenses and unannounced AWA compliance inspections keep the industry honest. But the reality is, these laws are woefully inadequate. For example, under the AWA: 

• There is no limit to the number of dogs on the premises. A puppy mill could have hundreds or even thousands of dogs.

• There is no minimum requirement for the number of staff that must be available to care for the dogs.

• Dogs may be kept in stacked cages.

• Mesh or wire flooring is allowed.

• Dogs may be forced to relieve themselves in their cages.

• Dogs may be confined in spaces only six inches longer than their bodies, not including the tail.

• A dog may be caged 24 hours a day for his or her entire life, only removed from the cage to be bred.

• There is no exercise requirement if dogs are housed with other dogs and minimum size requirements are met for the dog’s enclosure.

• Dogs can be housed indoors or out with minimal temperature regulation.

• Human interaction is not required.

• Breeding females at the first heat cycle and every heat cycle thereafter is permissible.

• Unwanted animals may auctioned off or killed in a variety of ways.

• There is no transparency to consumers or the public about the results of USDA inspections.

And finally, it should be obvious that the USDA can’t adequately inspect the entire puppy mill industry; currently there are only an estimated 110 inspectors on staff to inspect all the animal facilities under its supervision, including zoos and research labs, in addition to commercial dog breeders and brokers. 

The post Puppy Mills and the Inadequacy of the Animal Welfare Act appeared first on Whole Dog Journal.

Puppy Mills and the Inadequacy of the Animal Welfare Act

Here’s something that all of us can agree on: No one should ever buy a puppy from a puppy mill. Puppy mills are horrific and should be put out of business. 

An estimated 2 million puppies are “produced” annually in puppy mills in the U.S. Since the number of dogs who are euthanized by shelters in this country every year is estimated to be 1.2 million, you can see why simply shutting down puppy mills is such an alluring idea to those of us who have worked in shelters. But it’s difficult to put an end to any practice that some people profit from, no matter how cruel it is.

That’s why we try to educate people – to make sure they understand, first of all, that any “purebred” or “designer-mix” puppy that’s for sale in a pet shop has been produced by a puppy mill, no matter what the store employees have been told to say. 

We also try to make would-be buyers understand that when they pay for a puppy from a pet store, they are directly supporting canine suffering at the hands of all the shady breeders, brokers, and scammers that supply pet stores. 

Most of us have seen photos and videos taken by animal protection groups following a raid on the worst kind of puppy mill, where the living conditions of the dogs are unspeakably horrendous, with cages crammed with sore-covered dogs stacked on top of more cages, and all of them full of filth. No one would argue for ”businesses” like this to be allowed to continue operation.

It’s much more difficult to recognize the cruelty of puppy mills that advertise how many veterinarians they have on staff, discuss their healthcare and socialization programs, and display pictures of shiny-clean facilities alongside their United States Department of Agriculture (USDA) licenses. The conditions look better – but their breeder dogs are still puppy-producing machines who have no semblance of quality of life. And the puppies will be sold to anyone willing to pay for them and shipped anywhere in the country at too-early ages. 

The bottom line for mills is that puppies are simply “products” – and the puppy miller’s bottom line will always be more important than the welfare of the dogs.

The USDA’s Animal Welfare Act (AWA) establishes legal requirements for the care, handling, housing, transportation, and sale of animals at licensed breeding facilities. Puppy-millers and their downstream co-conspirators like to claim that their USDA licenses and unannounced AWA compliance inspections keep the industry honest. But the reality is, these laws are woefully inadequate. For example, under the AWA: 

• There is no limit to the number of dogs on the premises. A puppy mill could have hundreds or even thousands of dogs.

• There is no minimum requirement for the number of staff that must be available to care for the dogs.

• Dogs may be kept in stacked cages.

• Mesh or wire flooring is allowed.

• Dogs may be forced to relieve themselves in their cages.

• Dogs may be confined in spaces only six inches longer than their bodies, not including the tail.

• A dog may be caged 24 hours a day for his or her entire life, only removed from the cage to be bred.

• There is no exercise requirement if dogs are housed with other dogs and minimum size requirements are met for the dog’s enclosure.

• Dogs can be housed indoors or out with minimal temperature regulation.

• Human interaction is not required.

• Breeding females at the first heat cycle and every heat cycle thereafter is permissible.

• Unwanted animals may auctioned off or killed in a variety of ways.

• There is no transparency to consumers or the public about the results of USDA inspections.

And finally, it should be obvious that the USDA can’t adequately inspect the entire puppy mill industry; currently there are only an estimated 110 inspectors on staff to inspect all the animal facilities under its supervision, including zoos and research labs, in addition to commercial dog breeders and brokers. 

The post Puppy Mills and the Inadequacy of the Animal Welfare Act appeared first on Whole Dog Journal.

Police Dog Sniffs Out Missing Mom & Baby On His Very First Shift

Max, a newly-licensed police dog, hit the ground running when he located a woman and her one-year-old child during his very first shift!

Alongside his handler PC Peter Lloyd, Max used his tracking skills to find the mother and child on the edge of a ravine in Powys, Wales. The pair had spent the night at the mercy of the elements.

“The woman had not been seen or spoken to for two days, which was out of character, and her phone wasn’t working, so naturally concern for her safety was high,” Inspector Jonathan Rees-Jones said in a press release.

Image via Twitter/Dyfed-Powys Police

A Mother & Child At “Significant Risk Of Harm”

After failing to locate the woman at her home, police tracked her car to a remote mountain road. The team was glad to have a location to search, but were concerned given the vastness of the area and the amount of time the pair had been missing.

“This is where PD Max’s tracking skills really came into play. Despite only recently becoming licensed, and on his first operational shift, he immediately commenced an open area search.”

Image via Twitter/Dyfed-Powys Police

The Best Possible Outcome

After tracking a significant distance, PD Max and PC Lloyd located the missing woman. She was holding her baby and waving for help near a steep ravine on the mountainside. Mother and child were checked over by a Mountain Rescue doctor and found to be in good health.

“Thankfully, after an hour-and-a-half of searching, the mum and baby were found. They were safe, but cold, and appeared to have been in the area for a significant amount of time,” Inspector Rees-Jones said. “I must give a special mention to PC Pete Lloyd and Max, who on their very first day since completing their training together covered a significant amount of mileage in the search, eventually locating them safe.”

Image via Twitter/Dyfed-Powys Police

A Brand New Team

PC Lloyd joined the Dyfed-Powys Police dog section in February, and this rescue was his first operational shift with Max.

Max will primarily serve as a tracking dog, locating people in buildings and open air. He will also assist in tracing discarded property and tracking and detaining suspects.

PC Lloyd said:

“I was really pleased that during our first operational deployment as a dog team, myself and Max were able to safely locate the missing mother and baby. Max remained focused throughout the long search and he proved invaluable when he reacted to the call for help which resulted in us locating them.”

Image via Twitter/Dyfed-Powys Police

The people of Powys, Wales are very lucky to have this K9 team watching out for them!

H/T to USA Today
Featured Image via Twitter/Dyfed-Powys Police

The post Police Dog Sniffs Out Missing Mom & Baby On His Very First Shift appeared first on iHeartDogs.com.

Puppy Mills and the Inadequacy of the Animal Welfare Act

Here’s something that all of us can agree on: No one should ever buy a puppy from a puppy mill. Puppy mills are horrific and should be put out of business. 

An estimated 2 million puppies are “produced” annually in puppy mills in the U.S. Since the number of dogs who are euthanized by shelters in this country every year is estimated to be 1.2 million, you can see why simply shutting down puppy mills is such an alluring idea to those of us who have worked in shelters. But it’s difficult to put an end to any practice that some people profit from, no matter how cruel it is.

That’s why we try to educate people – to make sure they understand, first of all, that any “purebred” or “designer-mix” puppy that’s for sale in a pet shop has been produced by a puppy mill, no matter what the store employees have been told to say. 

We also try to make would-be buyers understand that when they pay for a puppy from a pet store, they are directly supporting canine suffering at the hands of all the shady breeders, brokers, and scammers that supply pet stores. 

Most of us have seen photos and videos taken by animal protection groups following a raid on the worst kind of puppy mill, where the living conditions of the dogs are unspeakably horrendous, with cages crammed with sore-covered dogs stacked on top of more cages, and all of them full of filth. No one would argue for ”businesses” like this to be allowed to continue operation.

It’s much more difficult to recognize the cruelty of puppy mills that advertise how many veterinarians they have on staff, discuss their healthcare and socialization programs, and display pictures of shiny-clean facilities alongside their United States Department of Agriculture (USDA) licenses. The conditions look better – but their breeder dogs are still puppy-producing machines who have no semblance of quality of life. And the puppies will be sold to anyone willing to pay for them and shipped anywhere in the country at too-early ages. 

The bottom line for mills is that puppies are simply “products” – and the puppy miller’s bottom line will always be more important than the welfare of the dogs.

The USDA’s Animal Welfare Act (AWA) establishes legal requirements for the care, handling, housing, transportation, and sale of animals at licensed breeding facilities. Puppy-millers and their downstream co-conspirators like to claim that their USDA licenses and unannounced AWA compliance inspections keep the industry honest. But the reality is, these laws are woefully inadequate. For example, under the AWA: 

• There is no limit to the number of dogs on the premises. A puppy mill could have hundreds or even thousands of dogs.

• There is no minimum requirement for the number of staff that must be available to care for the dogs.

• Dogs may be kept in stacked cages.

• Mesh or wire flooring is allowed.

• Dogs may be forced to relieve themselves in their cages.

• Dogs may be confined in spaces only six inches longer than their bodies, not including the tail.

• A dog may be caged 24 hours a day for his or her entire life, only removed from the cage to be bred.

• There is no exercise requirement if dogs are housed with other dogs and minimum size requirements are met for the dog’s enclosure.

• Dogs can be housed indoors or out with minimal temperature regulation.

• Human interaction is not required.

• Breeding females at the first heat cycle and every heat cycle thereafter is permissible.

• Unwanted animals may auctioned off or killed in a variety of ways.

• There is no transparency to consumers or the public about the results of USDA inspections.

And finally, it should be obvious that the USDA can’t adequately inspect the entire puppy mill industry; currently there are only an estimated 110 inspectors on staff to inspect all the animal facilities under its supervision, including zoos and research labs, in addition to commercial dog breeders and brokers. 

The post Puppy Mills and the Inadequacy of the Animal Welfare Act appeared first on Whole Dog Journal.

Dog Eagerly Awaits The Arrival Of Her Human’s School Bus

As a kid, I always had plenty of reasons to be excited to go home at the end of a school day. Chief among those reasons of course was knowing my dog Dudley would be waiting at the top of the driveway for me. That grin and wagging tail made for a nice reward after a day’s worth of school.

In an adorable YouTube video viewed over 1 million times, a pup named Nala awaits the return of her school-aged sibling. We tune in right as the Pit-mix recognizes one of her favorite sounds: the school bus approaching. She sees the bright yellow bus as it stops in front of the house.

Screenshot, @LMarie624/YouTube

“Who’s that Nala?” her mom prompts. When her brother emerges, Nala knows for sure. Her brother is finally back!

They may not be able to read clocks or watches, but dogs do pick up on certain scheduling consistencies. They use scent, sound, and other visual cues to anticipate things. Things like the noise a bus makes or the smell of gasoline. They’re perfectly capable of making associations and learning (as we learned from the Pavlov experiments.)

@LMarie624/YouTube

In the video, Nala takes a leap off the porch and runs towards the street as her brother exits the bus. The little boy doesn’t even bother going much past the end of the driveway. He knows Nala will meet him there, tail wagging at lightning speed.

Screenshot, @LMarie624/YouTube

This pure, unadulterated excitement at our return is no doubt one of the best things about having dogs. It certainly is the reason my phone storage is constantly full of videos of tail wagging and eager jumping. Obviously we all enjoy videos of this nature, given this one’s popularity.

Screenshot, @LMarie624/YouTube

Watch the thrilling arrival of the long-awaited school bus below:

The Bond Between Boy And Dog

Nala and her brother have been the best of friends since she was a wee puppy. Nala knows him as a member of her pack, and she values him. That feeling is certainly mutual! Other videos on user @LMarie624’s YouTube channel feature displays of friendship between the two.

Screenshot, @LMarie624/YouTube

Growing up with a dog isn’t just a way to learn responsibility. It’s the formation of a deep emotional bond. Plus, they make great sword fighting opponents.

If you have good footage of your pups greeting you upon your return, send it our way!

H/T: Cesar’s Way
Featured Image: Screenshot, @LMarie624/YouTube

The post Dog Eagerly Awaits The Arrival Of Her Human’s School Bus appeared first on iHeartDogs.com.

Puppy Mills and the Inadequacy of the Animal Welfare Act

Here’s something that all of us can agree on: No one should ever buy a puppy from a puppy mill. Puppy mills are horrific and should be put out of business. 

An estimated 2 million puppies are “produced” annually in puppy mills in the U.S. Since the number of dogs who are euthanized by shelters in this country every year is estimated to be 1.2 million, you can see why simply shutting down puppy mills is such an alluring idea to those of us who have worked in shelters. But it’s difficult to put an end to any practice that some people profit from, no matter how cruel it is.

That’s why we try to educate people – to make sure they understand, first of all, that any “purebred” or “designer-mix” puppy that’s for sale in a pet shop has been produced by a puppy mill, no matter what the store employees have been told to say. 

We also try to make would-be buyers understand that when they pay for a puppy from a pet store, they are directly supporting canine suffering at the hands of all the shady breeders, brokers, and scammers that supply pet stores. 

Most of us have seen photos and videos taken by animal protection groups following a raid on the worst kind of puppy mill, where the living conditions of the dogs are unspeakably horrendous, with cages crammed with sore-covered dogs stacked on top of more cages, and all of them full of filth. No one would argue for ”businesses” like this to be allowed to continue operation.

It’s much more difficult to recognize the cruelty of puppy mills that advertise how many veterinarians they have on staff, discuss their healthcare and socialization programs, and display pictures of shiny-clean facilities alongside their United States Department of Agriculture (USDA) licenses. The conditions look better – but their breeder dogs are still puppy-producing machines who have no semblance of quality of life. And the puppies will be sold to anyone willing to pay for them and shipped anywhere in the country at too-early ages. 

The bottom line for mills is that puppies are simply “products” – and the puppy miller’s bottom line will always be more important than the welfare of the dogs.

The USDA’s Animal Welfare Act (AWA) establishes legal requirements for the care, handling, housing, transportation, and sale of animals at licensed breeding facilities. Puppy-millers and their downstream co-conspirators like to claim that their USDA licenses and unannounced AWA compliance inspections keep the industry honest. But the reality is, these laws are woefully inadequate. For example, under the AWA: 

• There is no limit to the number of dogs on the premises. A puppy mill could have hundreds or even thousands of dogs.

• There is no minimum requirement for the number of staff that must be available to care for the dogs.

• Dogs may be kept in stacked cages.

• Mesh or wire flooring is allowed.

• Dogs may be forced to relieve themselves in their cages.

• Dogs may be confined in spaces only six inches longer than their bodies, not including the tail.

• A dog may be caged 24 hours a day for his or her entire life, only removed from the cage to be bred.

• There is no exercise requirement if dogs are housed with other dogs and minimum size requirements are met for the dog’s enclosure.

• Dogs can be housed indoors or out with minimal temperature regulation.

• Human interaction is not required.

• Breeding females at the first heat cycle and every heat cycle thereafter is permissible.

• Unwanted animals may auctioned off or killed in a variety of ways.

• There is no transparency to consumers or the public about the results of USDA inspections.

And finally, it should be obvious that the USDA can’t adequately inspect the entire puppy mill industry; currently there are only an estimated 110 inspectors on staff to inspect all the animal facilities under its supervision, including zoos and research labs, in addition to commercial dog breeders and brokers. 

The post Puppy Mills and the Inadequacy of the Animal Welfare Act appeared first on Whole Dog Journal.

Small Senior Dog Takes On Rattlesnake To Defend His Humans, And Wins

A couple went out for a hike in Pennington County, South Dakota with their 11-year-old Yorkshire Terrier, Bear. They encountered a rattlesnake along the trail. Bear did not hesitate to come between his humans and the venomous snake. The little dog was bitten while saving his people.

Image Devin Diede via KEVN

Dog Alerted to a Silent Rattlesnake on the Trail

Bear may be small in stature, but he is big on courage! Devin Diede and his wife, Alex were trekking along when suddenly Bear, their 11-year-old male Yorkshire Terrier, alerted them to a major danger. Sitting silently, waiting to strike, was a rattlesnake!

Devin or Alex would have stepped on the snake themselves, but Bear’s warning stopped them cold in their tracks. During the brief, but terrifying encounter, the couple was unclear as to whether or not the snake struck Bear. 

Image Devin Diede via KEVN

Bear Was Bitten and Rushed to Nearest Vet

At first, Devin and Alex were not sure if Bear was bitten during his encounter with the snake. They did not immediately find any puncture wounds on him. However, after some time passed, they noticed that Bear was not putting any weight on one of his front legs. They rushed to the nearest vet to receive emergency care.

Bear Could Not Walk Upon Arrival at Vet Clinic

About an hour and a half had passed between the encounter with the snake and the family’s arrival at the vet clinic. By the time they got there, Bear could not walk at all. Of course, the couple feared for Bear’s health and remained hopeful that he could recover. 

“Thankfully, the veterinarians and technicians at the emergency animal clinic in Rapid City were wonderful,” Diede told KEVN. “The vet took him and immediately started a blood transfusion.” Bear stayed overnight at the emergency clinic.

Image Devin Diede via KEVN

The Tough Little Guy Made a Full Recovery

Bear was able to go home with his family after staying overnight for observation and continued care. Devin commented to KEVN that Bear is “a tough little guy and most definitely a hero. He didn’t yip or bark” during the attack. When Bear came home, he was acting as if nothing ever happened. “He’s doing surprisingly well,” Diede said. “He’s walking around just fine and as happy as could be.”

Hip hip hooray for Bear! We are so happy that his heroic efforts led to a happy ending for him and his human companions, too!

H/T foxnews.com
Featured Image Devin Diede via KEVN

The post Small Senior Dog Takes On Rattlesnake To Defend His Humans, And Wins appeared first on iHeartDogs.com.

Help Your Pup Fight The Heat With A Healthy Homemade Ice Cream Pop

dog ice creamdog ice cream

Fur parents are coming up with creative ways to keep their dogs cool throughout the summer. With TikTok being one of the most popular sources of food trends and DIY tricks these days, it’s no wonder this dog-friendly TikTok recipe is making the rounds!

Though many recipes are made with humans in mind, this TikTok user found a way to join their dog into the fun. By using a few tasty dog-approved items, he created a delicious and healthy ice cream snack for the canine companions in our lives.

dog ice creamdog ice cream
ChefsandDogs/Tiktok

You will only need 3 ingredients to create this healthy ice cream dog pop, as well as a silicon tray for easy measuring and freezer storage.

  • 1 cup of natural Greek yogurt
  • 1/3 of a cup of bone broth
  • About a handful of beef treats

Now that you’ve gathered your supplies, let’s get into the recipe!

The TikTok begins with the user pouring 1 cup of Greek yogurt into a medium-sized bowl. He then adds 1/3 of a cup of bone broth, along with a handful of his dog’s favorite beef treats. Once all the ingredients have been poured into the bowl, he then begins to lightly fold the ingredients together using a spoon.

Once you have mixed the pupsicle ingredients, you can then pour the mixture into a silicone tray for easy portion control and storage. The fur parent in the video uses dehydrated salmon spine as a handle for the ice cream, but you can choose any edible and dog-friendly handle of your choice! Now that your pupsicle prep is complete, you can throw them into the freezer for 2-4 hours before serving.

@chefsanddogs

Your dog will be begging for more 😉 #petvlog #icecream #doggo #bordercollie #doglife

♬ Surrender – Natalie Taylor

It’s clear that the lucky pup in the video loved his doggie ice cream pop, what do others have to say about this unique canine dessert? Well, if you scroll the comments, you will find plenty of happy canine taste testers!

“Thank you for the idea! I added peanut butter to mine and my dogs went crazy!”

 

“My dog is currently waiting by the freezer for his to be ready!”

Once your dog has tried their homemade ice cream pops, you can scroll through the @chefsanddogs TikTok account to get even more tasty ideas to offer your canine BFF. Chefs & Dogs is dedicated to showing pet parents the finer side of dog cuisine, and wants to help you spoil your fur baby as much as possible!

H/T: fm104.ie
Image Source: ChefsandDogs/Tiktok

The post Help Your Pup Fight The Heat With A Healthy Homemade Ice Cream Pop appeared first on iHeartDogs.com.

Rescue Dog With Untreatable Tumor Shows The World Her Beauty

Dog with Invasive TumorDog with Invasive Tumor

Serenity might not look like most dogs. But she has the spirit and energy of a playful puppy. She doesn’t care what the world thinks about her because she’s happy and finally getting the love she deserves.

The 4-year-old Siberian Husky was a stray in San Antonio, Texas. The large tumor on her face prevented her from finding the loving home she deserved. So, Dallas Dog Rescue Rehab Reform transported her to Dallas, Texas to give her a second chance at life.

Dog with Invasive TumorDog with Invasive Tumor
Image: @DallasDogRRR/Facebook

Meet Serenity!

Right away, Serenity’s foster mom, Patti Dawson, could tell that Serenity was a happy pup. The dog came right up to her with kisses, expecting pets in return. But unfortunately, Dawson doesn’t know how much time Serenity has left in this world.

The vet confirmed that Serenity’s invasive tumor has taken away the bones in her face. It invaded her nasal cavity and went above her eye sockets and skull. Luckily, she can still see, breathe, and eat though.

Some dog lovers worry that Serenity is in pain, but Dawson says the pup has shown no signs of discomfort so far. Yet, she also knows that could potentially change in the future.

Dog with Tumor Being PetDog with Tumor Being Pet
Image: @DallasDogRRR/Facebook

“We didn’t get the news we wanted, but that doesn’t mean we’re going to stop loving her and giving her the life she deserves,” said Dawson.

So, Dawson decided to make the remainder of Serenity’s time extra special. She has spoiled her with delicious meals and lots of playtime. She even had a photographer take beautiful photos of Serenity to help encourage people to donate to her care.

Rescue_Dog_SerenityRescue_Dog_Serenity
Image: @DallasDogRRR/Facebook

Living Her Best Life

Animal photographer Renee Dowhaniuk took stunning pictures of Serenity. When the rescue shared them online, the pup soon became a star. Everyone was interested in Serenity’s story, and they wanted to help in any way possible.

“I don’t believe you should take a sad picture. I believe you should take a picture of the full potential and do everything you can to capture the spirit of the animal,” Dowhaniuk said. “That girl, as soon as we lifted her out of Patti’s vehicle and set her down, that nose was working and the tail was wagging.”

Rescue Dog DonationsRescue Dog Donations
Image: @DallasDogRRR/Facebook

Soon, donations began flooding in like crazy. The rescue received over 300 care packages with goodies for Serenity. Now, every time the pup gets a package, she’s overjoyed. She’s truly getting spoiled for the rest of her life just like she should.

Dawson said that when Serenity tells her it’s time, she will say goodbye. But for now, the rescue pup will keep living her best life in her loving foster home. If you’d like to donate to help Serenity or any of the other dogs in the rescue’s care, please check out their wishlist.

Dog with Tumor ChewingDog with Tumor Chewing
Image: @DallasDogRRR/Facebook

H/T: wfaa.com
Featured Image: @DallasDogRRR/Facebook

The post Rescue Dog With Untreatable Tumor Shows The World Her Beauty appeared first on iHeartDogs.com.

Puppy Mills and the Inadequacy of the Animal Welfare Act

Here’s something that all of us can agree on: No one should ever buy a puppy from a puppy mill. Puppy mills are horrific and should be put out of business. 

An estimated 2 million puppies are “produced” annually in puppy mills in the U.S. Since the number of dogs who are euthanized by shelters in this country every year is estimated to be 1.2 million, you can see why simply shutting down puppy mills is such an alluring idea to those of us who have worked in shelters. But it’s difficult to put an end to any practice that some people profit from, no matter how cruel it is.

That’s why we try to educate people – to make sure they understand, first of all, that any “purebred” or “designer-mix” puppy that’s for sale in a pet shop has been produced by a puppy mill, no matter what the store employees have been told to say. 

We also try to make would-be buyers understand that when they pay for a puppy from a pet store, they are directly supporting canine suffering at the hands of all the shady breeders, brokers, and scammers that supply pet stores. 

Most of us have seen photos and videos taken by animal protection groups following a raid on the worst kind of puppy mill, where the living conditions of the dogs are unspeakably horrendous, with cages crammed with sore-covered dogs stacked on top of more cages, and all of them full of filth. No one would argue for ”businesses” like this to be allowed to continue operation.

It’s much more difficult to recognize the cruelty of puppy mills that advertise how many veterinarians they have on staff, discuss their healthcare and socialization programs, and display pictures of shiny-clean facilities alongside their United States Department of Agriculture (USDA) licenses. The conditions look better – but their breeder dogs are still puppy-producing machines who have no semblance of quality of life. And the puppies will be sold to anyone willing to pay for them and shipped anywhere in the country at too-early ages. 

The bottom line for mills is that puppies are simply “products” – and the puppy miller’s bottom line will always be more important than the welfare of the dogs.

The USDA’s Animal Welfare Act (AWA) establishes legal requirements for the care, handling, housing, transportation, and sale of animals at licensed breeding facilities. Puppy-millers and their downstream co-conspirators like to claim that their USDA licenses and unannounced AWA compliance inspections keep the industry honest. But the reality is, these laws are woefully inadequate. For example, under the AWA: 

• There is no limit to the number of dogs on the premises. A puppy mill could have hundreds or even thousands of dogs.

• There is no minimum requirement for the number of staff that must be available to care for the dogs.

• Dogs may be kept in stacked cages.

• Mesh or wire flooring is allowed.

• Dogs may be forced to relieve themselves in their cages.

• Dogs may be confined in spaces only six inches longer than their bodies, not including the tail.

• A dog may be caged 24 hours a day for his or her entire life, only removed from the cage to be bred.

• There is no exercise requirement if dogs are housed with other dogs and minimum size requirements are met for the dog’s enclosure.

• Dogs can be housed indoors or out with minimal temperature regulation.

• Human interaction is not required.

• Breeding females at the first heat cycle and every heat cycle thereafter is permissible.

• Unwanted animals may auctioned off or killed in a variety of ways.

• There is no transparency to consumers or the public about the results of USDA inspections.

And finally, it should be obvious that the USDA can’t adequately inspect the entire puppy mill industry; currently there are only an estimated 110 inspectors on staff to inspect all the animal facilities under its supervision, including zoos and research labs, in addition to commercial dog breeders and brokers. 

The post Puppy Mills and the Inadequacy of the Animal Welfare Act appeared first on Whole Dog Journal.